A Zig Zag Attempt

Their home in mine, or the other way around
A „termitic“ approach to Los Angeles


solo exhibition, mixed media
T/abor Vienna, 2018
construction: Paul Leitner
sound installation: Thomas Grill

show text

Vienna to Los Angeles and back again: After the festival premiere of her essay film Tarpaulins, Viennese artist and filmmaker Lisa Truttmann transposes her artistic investigation of the life, habitat and labor of termites from the screen and into the exhibition space of T/abor. The termite's home is also the home of humans, where wood is. Consequently, wooden constructions full of subtle sound installations map the space at T/abor. Truttmann expands on her view of the megalopolis Los Angeles by panning between micro and macro perspectives on its invisible inhabitants and their considerable potential for destruction. Her rendering of the film into the third dimension stages labor and thought processes, together with the respective tools: The gallery's white cube converts into a circus tent, building construction materials engage in dialogue with moving images, and chaotic paper notes consolidate into an art book. In short: A Zig Zag Attempt carries us off to another place, and this way reveals a productive liminal space between Film and Art.

text by Antonia Rahofer
supported by BKA


A Zig Zag Attempt

Their home in mine, or the other way around
A „termitic“ approach to Los Angeles


solo exhibition, mixed media
T/abor Vienna, 2018
construction: Paul Leitner
sound installation: Thomas Grill

show text

Vienna to Los Angeles and back again: After the festival premiere of her essay film Tarpaulins, Viennese artist and filmmaker Lisa Truttmann transposes her artistic investigation of the life, habitat and labor of termites from the screen and into the exhibition space of T/abor. The termite's home is also the home of humans, where wood is. Consequently, wooden constructions full of subtle sound installations map the space at T/abor. Truttmann expands on her view of the megalopolis Los Angeles by panning between micro and macro perspectives on its invisible inhabitants and their considerable potential for destruction. Her rendering of the film into the third dimension stages labor and thought processes, together with the respective tools: The gallery's white cube converts into a circus tent, building construction materials engage in dialogue with moving images, and chaotic paper notes consolidate into an art book. In short: A Zig Zag Attempt carries us off to another place, and this way reveals a productive liminal space between Film and Art.

text by Antonia Rahofer
supported by BKA